Adventures in Linux

Pretty much what it says on the tin. An amateur's perspective on the world of Linux.

About the Author


Anastasia Trombly is a college student living in western Massachusetts. She is a devoted Linux user, and occasionally writes for the OpenSim blog Hypergrid Business.


LinuxChix button

This blog is moving to a new site. An actual one, with a custom domain name and everything. Very exciting. 

View the new page here!

www.adventuresinlinux.com

There’s new content up there already, and I will no longer be posting to this blog.

The main reason for this switch is that I wanted something more professional to show people. In case you were wondering.

fredobandito:

adventures-in-linux:

Okay, so I just installed Fedora 19 on an old laptop. I like the new lock screen thing, but overall I’m fairly unimpressed. Plus, wifi isn’t working out of box, which is annoying. This same computer never had any problems with the Ubuntu 13.04 or Mint 14. 

Still, I’ve read it’s got lots of 3D printing support, so maybe it’ll end up being more of a specialty OS than an everyday one. 

It’s weird though, I feel like I never had this problem with older releases. 

I’m using Fedora 19 on a ThinkPad R60 from around 2006 and it hasn’t given me any kinds of issues with hardware. Your analysis that Fedora 19 is a generally unimpressive release is accurate; there’s no real wow factor.

Having used Fedora for about a year and a half now, I’ve noticed that between releases, certain things get fixed and other things get unfixed, but it’s never been anything so major as removing Wi-Fi support. I know that the Fedora Project generally adheres to FSF guidelines regarding inclusion of nonfree packages in repositories, but it’s strange to me that, if you haven’t had these issues in past releases, that you’d be having them now.

It is really weird. Of course, the laptop is really old, so I’m not ruling out a problem with the hardware, not the software. 

Okay, so I just installed Fedora 19 on an old laptop. I like the new lock screen thing, but overall I’m fairly unimpressed. Plus, wifi isn’t working out of box, which is annoying. This same computer never had any problems with the Ubuntu 13.04 or Mint 14. 

Still, I’ve read it’s got lots of 3D printing support, so maybe it’ll end up being more of a specialty OS than an everyday one. 

It’s weird though, I feel like I never had this problem with older releases. 

So, I’ve been hearing a lot of stuff about openSUSE lately. Apparently it’s very good. But before I jump on the openSUSE bandwagon, I’m dying to know: is it really that good?

Wow, it’s been a while, hasn’t it. Let me tell you what I’ve been doing in this time (computer-wise):

I left Linux Mint after a faulty hard drive caused insane amounts of computer errors and I had to get a new computer. I installed Ubuntu 12.10 on it, simply because I need something to pass the time until they finally come out with a new version of Elementary. However, the computer I’m using, which a friend just sort of hacked together for me, is also faulty (he thinks it’s a fan problem) and is causing internal errors all over the place, and causing both Chrome and Chromium to crash for no reason all the time. (Probably? I’m not sure what else could be causing it.)

In the mean time, I’m saving up for a new laptop. I’m thinking of maybe something from System 76, which comes pre-installed with Ubuntu. I figure it’ll be cheaper than paying an addition hundred dollars or so for an operating system I’ll never use (coughWindowscough).

Also, expect some more reviews in the future, once I get my desktop situation sorted out. I probably shouldn’t be reviewing anything while my desktop is throwing up errors everywhere, since I don’t want to give something an undeserved bad review.

Thoughts and/or suggestions?

Asker cipricus Asks:
Have you ever tried the real light versions of Ubuntu? - that is Xubuntu and (especiallly light) Lubuntu? Many freezing problems are hardware-resource related. You might see a computer completely rejuvenated in Lubuntu.
adventures-in-linux adventures-in-linux Said:

My freezing problems definitely were not hardware-resource related, I was using a fantastic computer that had never had problems before. But, as it was, it was a hard drive issue. If only I had known about the problem back then, I could have gotten a new hard drive while it was still under warranty… 

Ah, summer. Long days of nothing, spent messing around on my computer. I was so blissfully ignorant back then. 

Asker cipricus Asks:
I see you had problems with Ubuntu. How it's Linux Mint going since? All problems in Ubuntu are in my opinion related to possible upgrade mishaps or hardware compatibility. I use Ubunu/Lubuntu to the limit and each time I nearly distroy it I can easily put it back on track. The best thing about it is the community support on askubuntu webpage. You get answers in munutes. I hope mint has something close to that.
adventures-in-linux adventures-in-linux Said:

It was indeed a hardware problem, and eventually even Linux Mint was all messed up. Apparently there was a manufacturer defect in the brand new hard drive I just bought over the summer, and the warranty ran out in September so just had to get a new hard drive. Thankfully getting a new one wasn’t that bad, and now my computer is functional again. I’m currently using Ubuntu 12.10 while I wait until Elementary Luna comes out of beta, and I have a bad feeling that it’s going to take forever to get out of beta. Possibly even enough time for me to try out Ubuntu 13.04 when it comes out. 

Asker cipricus Asks:
What about SMPlayer? I guess VLC is the only non-mplayer video player in Ubuntu. Totem and Gnome Player are just fronts, just like SMPlayer, which is more modern, more stable, with many more settings than Totem and Gnome Player. The feature of stoping video upon click is one of the many possible settings in SMPlayer. Subtitles support is much more advanced. SMPlayer is the only real rival to VLC.
adventures-in-linux adventures-in-linux Said:

Personally, I never liked SMPlayer. I’m not really sure why, I think it was something to do with the look of it? And it just never worked as cleanly as the other media players I ran.

So, I’ve been using Linux Mint for a day now, and so far it hasn’t crashed, it hasn’t frozen, it hasn’t broken out of my computer and stabbed my through the heart, and it hasn’t been laggy at all. The only issue I’ve been having is a weird thing when I try to install programs, but it feels like the kind of problem that will disappear if I just bothered to reboot the computer.

In summation, I am very pleased with my spiff new (except not really that new) operating system. 

Sorry, Ubuntu fans, but I’ve been successfully converted.

Although when the new version of Elementary OS comes out, I might switch to that, just because it looks sweet.